Tag Archives: degeneration

Vascular Tissue Challenge Update

NASA and Methuselah Foundation’s VTC Challenge

One Year in, the Vascular Tissue Challenge Teams are Moving Forward

July 13, 2017

Last June, the Methuselah Foundation and NASA officially launched the Vascular Tissue Challenge (VTC) at the White House Organ Summit, hosted by the Office of Science and Technology Policy. The VTC includes a $500,000 prize purse from NASA for the first teams that can successfully create thick (>1cm), vascularized tissues that remain functional and alive for more than 30 days. Along with this is the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space’s (CASIS) “Innovations in Space Award,” providing an additional $200,000 to support a research opportunity onboard the International Space Station’s National Laboratory!

With the one year mark just behind us, we thought it was fitting to check in with the teams and see how they’re doing. There’s been a lot happening to advance these amazing bioengineering technologies over the last 12 months!

TEAM UPDATES

Since launching the Vascular Tissue Challenge, seven research organizations officially signed on to pursue the challenge of creating the thick, vascularized tissues required to win the $700,000 in awards along with the opportunity to pursue further research using the microgravity environment onboard the International Space Station. Each team is pursuing a different approach to creating the thick, vascularized tissues, and each has their own unique strategies and hurdles ahead. Here is a quick snapshot of what some of the teams have been doing and what they are planning for their next steps toward winning the Challenge before the sunset of the award at the end of 2019.

Team: iTEAMS, Stanford University | Team Leader: Dr. Yunzhi “Peter” Yang

Over the past year, iTEAMS has proposed and proved an integrated multi-scale, multi-modular system approach to overcome the challenges and tradeoff in functional vasculature requirements between major vascular lasting perfusion and capillary rapid sprouting and extensive coverage for diffusion. The former requires a slowly degradable biomaterial for sustained perfusion and the latter requires a fast biodegradable biomaterial for rapid sprouting and diffusion.

The next steps being pursued are an optimization of perusable channel pathways, biomaterial candidates, and fabrication parameters. A critical upcoming milestone is to demonstrate functional microvasculature at a large scale for a long term in vitro. Team iTEAMS is working towards conducting their Vascular Tissue Challenge trials in 2018.

Team: BioPrinter, Florida Institute of Technology  |  Team Leader: Dr. Kunal Mitra

Dr. Mitra and his team have developed a self-contained bioprinting system that is being used for bioprinting tissue samples with high resolution and cell viability. They plan to use this printer to develop a sacrificial technique of bioprinting channels within a tissue sample. These channels will be used for the exchange of nutrients to cells needed to maintain viable tissue for an extended period of time. Currently, research is being conducted with various concentrations of bioink to obtain optical values that will result in high quality bioprinted tissue samples. In parallel, research on sacrificial techniques to create channels for nutrient flow is being conducted. The team anticipates that an official trial for the Vascular Tissue Challenge to be initiated in 2018.

Team: Flow, Maize, and Blue, University of Michigan  | Team Leader: Dr. Ming-Sing, Si

The team has built a perfusion bioreactor that it is currently optimizing for customized tissue engineered vascular networks. Dr. Si and his team hope to accomplish long-term perfusion of these vascular networks in the next 6 months with an official Vascular Tissue Challenge trial occurring sometime after that research is completed.

Team: TechshotTeam Leader: Dr. Eugene Boland

Last summer, Techshot began formal efforts toward winning the Vascular Tissue Challenge by 3D printing biological materials and adult stem cells into vascular and cardiac structures on board a Zero Gravity Corporation aircraft. Test structures were printed during cycles of both zero G and high G forces, permitting evaluation of low viscosity, biological material printing in multiple gravity environments. As expected, the cycles of microgravity facilitated layer-by-layer printing of 3D structures with very low viscosities (these materials become puddles if printed on the ground). The team’s next large step forward is a “Tissue Cassette” experiment that will be conducted this summer. Building upon last summer’s work, Techshot will bioprint larger cardiac and vascular structures within a specialized container, a bioreactor they refer to as a “Tissue Cassette”. This Tissue Cassette will not only provide an appropriate environment for culturing the 3D printed structure, it will impart physical and electrical cues to accelerate cell growth and tissue development. The bioreactor will also permit perfusion of the 3D bioprinted structure to further support cell growth in the larger printed volume. The planned experiments will start by bioprinting identical sets of cardiac and vascular structures with an initial print size of 20mm x 30mm x 10mm. One set will stay on the ground. The second set will be loaded into a Techshot ADSEP system and launched to the International Space Station aboard SpaceX Cargo Dragon (CRS-12) on August 1, 2017. These experiments will provide insight into bioprinted cell behavior in microgravity and the associated differences in tissue development. This will provide a preliminary test of the technology Techshot plans to use for their Vascular Tissue Challenge trials that they expect to conduct after getting these results back.

Team Penn State, Pennsylvania State University  |  Team Leader: Dr. Ibrahim Ozbolat

Dr. Ozbolat’s team has made substantial progress with their research on micro-vascularization in engineered islets. In addition, the team has scaled up tissue constructs to a sub-cm3 level and are working on expanding to the cm3 level for the VTC trial. They have demonstrated viable vascularization with mouse cells and are currently conducting research to overcome technical issues with the co-culture of stem cell-derived human beta cells and microvascular endothelial cells. Finalizing the research to reach vascularization with these cells at the cm3 level is the next critical step for this team, which they expect to take them into 2018 before conducting their final trials for the VTC.

 Team WFIRM Bioprinting, Wake Forest University  |  Team Leader: Dr. Anthony Atala

Contact: Dr. Sang-Jin Lee

During the past year, the WFIRM Bioprinting Team was focusing on the development of tissue-specific bioink systems that could mimic the microenvironments of each target tissues. The team assumes that these tissue-specific bioink systems can enhance the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions that can accelerate tissue maturation/formation and functions. Up next in the team’s research is to combine microvasculature created by endothelial cells with tissue-specific printed constructs. They plan to investigate the effects of endothelialized microvasculature on cell viability and tissue-specific functions of the tissue-specific printed constructs. It is not yet clear when the team’s VTC trials will start, more will be known after their next research projects are completed.

 

Team Vital Organs, Rice University  |  Team Leader: Dr. Jordan Miller

At Rice University, Team Vital Organs is continuing to build out their 3D printing technology, characterizing the precision, cell viability and activity, designing assays for tissue assessment, and designing proper vascular architectures for complete tissue integration. Perfusion systems are complicated, but the team has a new large incubator that can now accommodate their proposed perfusion systems for the VTC. They are now working on validating long-term sterility and measurements from longitudinal assays. Dr. Miller and his lab are looking forward to finishing these feasibility studies and putting together an official trial to win the Vascular Tissue Challenge within the next year.

Please click on the links for additional Information about the New Organ Alliance or the Vascular Tissue Challenge.

Methuselah Foundation Fellowship Award Winner Tackles Research in Macular Degeneration 

Jennifer Rosa small

Typically, a fellowship and participation in a research study to cure a major disease would occur years after completing undergrad, possibly even after earning a PhD. But Jennifer DeRosa is not a typical student.

As early as high school, DeRosa was already in the lab, conducting research in plant biotechnology at the College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY-ESF) before graduating valedictorian from Skaneateles High School. As a freshman student at Onondaga Community College, she continued to develop skills in molecular biology, analytical chemistry, and cell biology. She logged over 1,600 hours in academic and industry laboratories while maintaining a perfect 4.0 GPA, completing her associate’s degree in Math and Science in only one year.

Although she had planned to continue to a bachelor’s program, DeRosa elected to defer enrollment after being offered a Methuselah Foundation research fellowship. “The fellowship provides distinguished students a year-long stipend to work in any laboratory of their choosing that conducts work on age-associated diseases,” said Methuselah Foundation CEO David Gobel. “We are very pleased that she chose to complete her fellowship at Ichor Therapeutics, where she has been working as a paid intern. Methuselah Foundation has a high degree of confidence in the quality and scope of work being conducted there.”

Her enthusiasm for her work has caught the attention of everyone who works with her. “Jennifer [DeRosa] has distinguished herself at every level since beginning as an intern in January,” stated Ichor’s Quality Assurance Director Scott Campbell. “We are delighted about her decision to stay on and help us drive our age-related macular degeneration program into the next stage of development, including adopting of stringent GMP and GLP regulatory requirements.”

DeRosa is excited about the research that Ichor Therapeutics is currently engaged in, as well as the opportunities to learn in areas beyond the science itself. She said, “I chose to intern at Ichor because as a startup, I knew it would allow me to explore entrepreneurship and take on a greater role than I otherwise could at a large company. Between being able to participate in board meetings, discuss legal and translational strategy with Ichor’s counsel and advisory teams, and meeting the company’s investors to better understand their expectations – Let’s just say it was a simple decision for me to remain here.”

DeRosa’s previous research at Ichor substantially and directly contributed to the company successfully raising $600,000 for its macular degeneration program earlier this summer. DeRosa was a listed author on both the research proposal and business plan, and is also listed on two pending grant applications.

Kelsey Moody, CEO at Ichor Therapeutics, noted, “The most difficult part of having her here is finding sufficient challenges. She has earned complete autonomy since her arrival. Beyond her expansive laboratory skills, she has designed her own studies, written proposals for grants, and led a small team to develop product leads for the macular-degeneration program.”

When her fellowship draws to a close, DeRosa intends to pursue a bachelor’s degree or matriculate directly into a graduate program. However, she plans to remain opportunistic. “The pace, progress, and potential impact of Ichor’s macular degeneration program is addicting. The company’s main focus now is to prepare for series A, after which, who knows what opportunities may present themselves.”