Are Telomere Tests Ready for the Public?

Are Telomere Tests Ready for the Public?

Since these “biomarkers” shorten as we age, many companies have begun to offer home tests to potentially show the users “true” biological age, how healthy they are, and their susceptibility to various diseases. But are these tests ready for the public? And is it worth your money to try one?

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Is it Possible to Stay Younger As We Get Older?

Is it Possible to Stay Younger As We Get Older?

In the last 50 years the average life expectancy has been extended from 65 to 85, giving us an extra third of our life. Can we enjoy this substantial new chapter of life if we’re slowly being shackled by the bonds of aging? This article by the New Yorker discusses this intriguing topic!

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Alzheimers Study Now Recruiting Participants!

Alzheimers Study Now Recruiting Participants!

One of our partners, Leucadia Therapeutics, is pleased to announce that Project Cribrose is now live! They are recruiting participants for a 2000 person study, including healthy people from 20-90 years old, those with Alzheimer’s disease, Frontotemporal dementia, or Down Syndrome and people over 50 with mild cognitive impairment.

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Making of a Cover Photo

Making of a Cover Photo

On May 3 2019 Volumetric Bio made history, and made the cover of Science Magazine with their groundbreaking technology. But how does one go about photographing something smaller than a penny in sharp detail? This behind the scenes from Science Magazine goes into how they captured such an exceptional shot.

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Can an RNA-Binding Protein Keep You From Aging?

Can an RNA-Binding Protein Keep You From Aging?

Researchers at EPFL recently found that the RNA-binding protein PUM2 contributes to the accumulation of defective mitochondria, a key feature of the aging process. Targeting this protein in old animals protects against age-related mitochondrial dysfunction. What can this mean for humans though?

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Can the Bacteria in Your Stomach Reveal Your Age?

Can the Bacteria in Your Stomach Reveal Your Age?

Researchers in Maryland recently conducted a test examining 3,600 different samples of bacteria from 1,165 healthy individuals age 20-90. They found that bacteria actually differs vastly between various age groups. They think this “microbiome aging clock” could be used as a baseline to test how fast or slow a person’s gut is aging and how different diets might have an effect on longevity.

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Could Parasites Hold the Key to Your Health?

Could Parasites Hold the Key to Your Health?

Intestinal worms have long caused suffering in humans, but has our bias against a handful of harmful helminths led us to slaughter billions of helpful ones? Is our quest as humans to eradicate parasitic worms being accomplished to our detriment? And if we could treat or even prevent many of our modern inflammatory diseases with harmless intestinal worms, why don’t we?

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Breaking the Vascularity Barrier

Breaking the Vascularity Barrier

There are 3D bioprinters but no 3D printed usable organs. Why is that? Microvascularization is a key rate limiter preventing humans needing an organ transplant from having it made available to them. In other words, blood needs to get to the 3D printed tissue in order for the tissue to remain alive. Thankfully, a start-up we have proudly supported from inception is developing the necessary tools to solve the microvascularization challenge so that we can have functioning 3D printed organs.

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N of One: An Experiment In Not Flying Breathlessly

N of One: An Experiment In Not Flying Breathlessly

On a recent trip to California, my goal was to document an aircraft’s actual interior cabin altitude, versus the altitude of that aircraft’s distance above the ground. Finding this altitude would tell me how much oxygen would be in the cabin, where lower altitudes would mean more available oxygen.

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A Day in the Life of a 90-Year-Old

A Day in the Life of a 90-Year-Old

The elderly have wisdom of great value to all, but few listen. Their story is worth being heard. If things don’t change, we will all share their experience. This first-person narrative is the result of years of interviews and the extensive experience of a Registered Nurse specializing in Geriatrics. We invite you to live a day in the live of a 90 year old.

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The Methuselah Foundation Successfully Closes its Boutique Venture Fund

The Methuselah Foundation Successfully Closes its Boutique Venture Fund

The Methuselah Fund or M Fund is mission-oriented and was conceived after successful angel investments by the Methuselah Foundation. The M Fund's investment thesis is based on six strategies aimed at increasing healthy longevity and its current portfolio includes four exciting companies.

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Society for Gero-Engineering and Technology (SGET)

Society for Gero-Engineering and Technology (SGET)

For a while, we have seen that anti-aging is rapidly becoming an engineering challenge rather than a mere fantasy. To this point, our Foundation is also working on helping create a professional society focused on Geroengineering. Enter, the Society of Gero-Engineering and Technology, or SGET.

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What If Alzheimer's Disease Is Caused by "Bad Plumbing"?

What If Alzheimer's Disease Is Caused by "Bad Plumbing"?

Here is a fun question... Can you name one hole in your body that, if sewn shut, would help you function better?

Assuming you have an anatomically normal body, the answer is none. While saying that "bad plumbing" causes Alzheimer's Disease is an oversimplification, it is a great way to quickly explain why we angel invested in Leucadia Therapeutics in 2015. The Principal Scientist, Founder, and CEO of Leucadia Therapeutics, Doug Ethell, Ph.D., had an Occam Razor's approach to AD, which was refreshing to us and an inspiration. As it turns out, the Cribriform Plate that drains cerebrospinal fluid can get ossified or clogged as you age. In AD patients, it is always significantly clogged, thus the "bad plumbing" analogy. 


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Reconsidering Alzheimer's Disease

Reconsidering Alzheimer's Disease

In light of the underwhelming efficacy of human anti-Abeta clinical trials in the last several years, we are pleased to read the scientific community starting to reconsider the theory that amyloid beta (Abeta) is the primary causative factor in Alzheimer's disease. This paper is among several we've seen over the past year which criticizes the amyloid cascade hypothesis, and does a good job of balancing the supportive and contradictory evidence for the hypothesis.

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